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In this category, you will find our seasonal hard boiled sweets, assortment bags, ready-mixed hard boiled sweets, jars and tins – and of course you can also mix your very own favorites in a bag or tin. In the menu, you will find the subcategories which will provide you a general view of the possibilities for the packaging of the different hard boiled sweets.

Handmade in Copenhagen

We have retained the old manufacturing method, so the candies are still produced as for over 125 years ago. Watch our video to get an insight in the manufacturing method, or visit our factory in Copenhagen.

 

How is it made?

 

Sømod’s hard boiled sweets are made from our basic mass, which consists of 20 kg of coarse sugar, which gets boiled up to almost 180 degrees Celsius. This basic mass is, like all our ingredients, 100 % natural, which is something we take great pride in. The fact is that Sømod’s Hard boiled sweets are still produced using old traditions and natural ingredients therefore play a big role for us.

The liquid and golden sugar mass is poured onto our production table, where we then add a colour according to the type of hard boiled sweet being produced. In the next stage, the sugar is cooled down from 180 degrees Celsius to about 100 degrees by folding the mass multiple times. Only now the flavour can be added, and if this is done too early in the process, the flavour would evaporate.

Some candies are hurled around a hook. This is done only to hurl air into the candy mass and by doing this, it is possible to manipulate the color to make it lighter, as you prefer. Surely you know the process already, because if you have ever whipped egg whites, you will have seen the reaction when the slightly golden substance reacts to the air and turns white.

Now we have gotten to the construction of the hard boiled sweet itself. We have a few different approached; including using a cylinder with different shapes, a hand-driven cutting machine or solely using spatula and scissors, by which the candy is built from the middle and out.

Finally, the candies are in the wanted shape and must now cool – since otherwise they would melt together – before they can be packaged in jars, bags or tins. After having cooled down and being packaged, the hard-boiled sweets are ready for sale, and these are the same fine candies that be bought in our store and webshop.


Where does the Danish word “bolche” come from?

According to an urban folklore from 1716, the Zar, Peter the Great, of Russia was visiting Copenhagen. He rode through Nørregade on his trip to the King´s Christiansborg. In Nørregade he tasted sugar drops for the first time. He shouted “Boleye”, which means “more” in Russian. Later he was so impressed by this delicacy that he flung them out to all the children from his carriage, who then shouted this new word “boleye, boleye…” “more,more…”, of what the name “bolche” occured.

Whether the entire story is true is now known, but it is confirmed that Peter the Great was in Copenhagen in 1716, where he furthermore also visited Rundetårn to see the observatory, which he was very interested in. The Russian Zar would however not walk up the winding corridor himself, so he rode his horse all the way up, followed by his wife Katherina, who went by carriage.

 
Sømod's Bolcher - the family